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Measurements which are acquired by a 1st generation sensor. These measurements typically directly address the data requirements of a use case, obtaining final data. However, sensor limitations in terms of location necessitate extrapolation of these measurements to other ...
Mast mounted sensors and remote sensing vertical profilers that emulate the functionality of met masts are examples of 1st generation sensors
Final data derived by inference of wind conditions from measurements of intermediate variables in multiple probe volumes throughout the region of interest using scanning devices, rather than by extrapolation of direct measurements of final data acquired in a single ...
A sensor that directly acquires intermediate data throughout a region of interest, rather than require extrapolation of wind conditions measured using a 1st generation sensor to those locations. Examples of 2nd generation sensors include scanning lidars
Direct observation of final data in all locations of interest at arbitrary time and space resolution, without extrapolation from 1st generation measurements or inference from 2nd generation measurements. Data can be interpreted with direct reference to the data requirements ...
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No fully 3rd generation system currently exists, however a number of systems are available that deliver some of the functionality. Examples include multiple synchronised lidars implementing a convergent scan geometry (which provides final wind velocity vector data throughout ...
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Complex terrain is terrain that modifies the flow of wind over and around it. This gives rise to a phenomena known as "complex flow", which is the presence of highly variable wind fields.  Depending on the use case, complex flow can have the effect that there may be ...
A scan geometry comprised of a number of elements, each of which is a simple scan geometry, such that the beam is scanned using multiple degrees of freedom. The use of more than one degree of freedom can eliminate measurement ambiguities and provide more detailed information ...
A measurement configuration involving multiple lidar units which are operated in a coordinated and synchronised manner so that their beams converge and intersect at a succession of probe volumes. If three or more lidar units are used, it is possible to characterise ...
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A convergent scan geometry in which the lidar units implement intersecting RHI scan geometries. The probe volumes where the beams intersect then lie along a vertical locus of points where measurements might otherwise have been acquired using a met mast